Category Archives: Landscape

A more in depth look at the Sony a7 with metabones EF adapter

Here’s a few things I noticed with the Sony a7 and metabones adapter:

  1. The idea is great, sharp lenses with a great sensor.
  2. Autofocus (AF) generally work alright with L lenses.
  3. AF hunts a bit, focusing took about 4 secs with the 17-40L.
  4. Focus peaking works, but still requires a bit of practise.

That being said, I’ll let the photos speak for themselves. There is minimal post processing in the following photos so you can get a better idea of what to expect out of the camera and lens combination.

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Cockatoo Island, Sony a7 with Canon EF 17-40 f4L

When you nail the , the combination of quality glass and the Sony sensor delivers even in the dark.

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Sony a7 with Canon EF 17-40 f4L.

This one is all about the sensor, plenty of highlight and shadow detail that I managed to recover in Lightroom for this shot.

5 minute exposure with Sony a7 and Canon EF 17-40 f4L.
5 minute exposure with Sony a7 and Canon EF 17-40 f4L.

This photo had noise reduction performed in camera by the ay. My advise, turn off the automatic long exposure noise reduction otherwise you’ll be standing there for another 5 minutes waiting for the image to process.

Next up will be a more thorough test of the camera with a fast Canon prime at Vivid Sydney.

Stay tuned.

 

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Fuji 10-24mm f/4 Sample photos have surfaced!

This thing is the real deal: Tack sharp wide open, surprisingly rectilinear and with RIDICULOUS optical image stabilization

– David Hobby

If you don’t know who David Hobby is, he is the strobist, and here is his blog, this is him on DigitalRevTV doing the Pro Photog Cheap Camera Challenge, and just a super cool dude overall.

While I don’t have the luxury of trying out unreleased lenses, I do keep an eye out for these things and David Hobby just posted up 5 photos he took with his pre-release copy in Dubai.  You can see them in all their their hi-res glory on this flickr set.

Just reading through his captions and the images themselves, the things that jump out immediately are:

  • The lens is really sharp, like REALLY sharp
  • Distortion is extremely well controlled, no sign of barreling or pin-cushioning
  • The short focal length and OIS allowed him to get handheld shots at up to 2secs (I may have to try this one day).

Now, more about the lens … it’s full name is fujifilm XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS and it is designed to be used with the existing range of Fuji compact system cameras (CSC) such as X-E2, X-T1 etc.  The 10-24mm focal length gives a 15-36mm equivalent, while I’ve never used that exact focal length beforeI have spent a few days with a Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 and also own a Canon 17-40mm f/4L and Canon 15mm f/2.8 fisheye.

Sydney Queen Victoria Building. Canon 5D MkII with EF 15mm f/2.8 fisheye

Note that the Canon 15mm is a fisheye, so even though it is a rectilinear fisheye, the Fuji 10-24 won’t be quite as wide.  This will give you a good idea though.  Optical Image Stabilisation (OIS) is an interesting addition and shouldn’t be forgotten about.  Most camera manufacturers don’t bother adding OIS to ultra-wide lenses like these because they figured you wouldn’t need it.  Both Canon and Nikon have yet to release a fast ultra-wide lens with IS/VR but that may change in the near future.  The constant f/4 aperture is quite nice, I know a lot of people would prefer a constant f/2.8 but those are also the same people who refuse to pay up for it.

In this lens Fuji has managed to put together an optically sound, great looking, and robust lens that fills a void in their system while keeping it at a reasonable price ($999 USD on BH).  Keeping it below the $1000 mark is key because let’s face it not many of us are willing to pay any more than that on a CSC lens (regardless of how awesome it is).  Fuji has also managed to create a f/1.2 lens under that magic price point but I’ll cover that in another post!

As far as we can tell Fuji stepped up their CSC game, as an enthusiast I’m excited about where this is headed, as a Sony owner I’m curious to see what they’ll come up with to compete.

Tribute to my OM-D

For a while I was running the risk of sounding like a massive Sony fanboy.  Most of you will know that this isn’t true, I’ve been using Canon DSLR’s for years and my first mirrorless was an Olympus OM-D E-M5.  Sony has always been an extremely innovative company that’s not afraid to push the boundaries.  Let’s face it, Canon and Nikon are too afraid to put a full frame (FF) sensor in their compact system cameras because that’ll destroy their sub $2000 AUD DSLR market.  Olympus is unlikely to make a FF OM-D because they have an extensive m43 lens range which happens to be extremely popular and extremely sharp.  Going FF would mean a whole new lens range for Olympus and Pansonic.

Don’t get me wrong, my OM-D E-M5 is one of the finest cameras I’ve ever used, some of my best photos were taken with the OM-D.

Sydney Town Hall, Taken with OM-D E-M5 and 12mm f2.0.  Speaking of lenses, the m43 range of primes is one of the finest out there for compact system cameras.  I have and still use the Olympus 12mm f2.0 and Panasonic Leica 25mm f1.4.  Sharpness is incredible, focusing speed is quick and build quality is as you would expect for a fast prime (especially in the Oly 12mm).  The versatility of the m43 lens system is worth mentioning too, in case you didn’t know, Olympus and Panasonic “mirrorless cameras” share the same lens mount, which means you can use either brand on their bodies.

Did I mention how good the in body Image Stabilisation (IS) is on the E-M5?  In short, it’s incredible.  I can shoot hand held 1/15 shutter speeds with no issues.  Definitely not something I would try with my 5D2 or even the a7.  Olympus seems to have 5 axis IS figured out before the other manufacturers.  The harbour bridge photo above was taken hand held with E-M5 and Panasonic Leica 25mm f1.4.

I can’t have a post about the OM-D without mentioning just how awesome the kit lens is.  Yes, I said it, kit lens .. and yes, it’s good, REAL good.  The bee photo was taken with E-M5 and 12-50mm kit lens.  It has a neat little push action to activate macro mode and the image above is typical of the kind of quality you would get.  Obviously a lot of luck comes into these photos with timing and lighting but you can rest easy knowing an OM-D kit straight out of the box has the ability to get you quality like that!

With all these qualities, it’s unlikely I’ll officially retire the OM-D.  There are too many lenses I have for it that I love and it has taken SO many great photos for me.  In fact, I might go get it out now to have a play around …

– Chris

PS. This post was mainly about the E-M5 but a lot of the qualities apply to the new OM-D versions as well.  Personally I prefer the look of the E-M5 over the newer and more improved E-M1.